Lists

The easiest type of lists are unlabeled (itemized) lists as being expressed by the UL/LI tags in HTML. FO allows a much more detailed parametrization regarding indents and distances between labels and item content. Relevant elements are fo:list-block, fo:list-item and fo:list-item-body. The drawback is a more complex setup for default lists:

Figure 982. An itemized list and result. Create comment in forum
...
<fo:list-block
  provisional-distance-between-starts="2mm">
  <fo:list-item>
    <fo:list-item-label end-indent="label-end()">
      <fo:block>&#8226;</fo:block>
    </fo:list-item-label>
    <fo:list-item-body start-indent="body-start()">
      <fo:block>Flowers</fo:block>
    </fo:list-item-body>
  </fo:list-item>

  <fo:list-item>
    <fo:list-item-label end-indent="label-end()">
      <fo:block>&#8226;</fo:block>
    </fo:list-item-label>
    <fo:list-item-body start-indent="body-start()">
      <fo:block>Animals</fo:block>
    </fo:list-item-body>
  </fo:list-item>
</fo:list-block> ...
An itemized list and result.

The result looks somewhat primitive in relation to the amount of source code it necessitates. The power of these constructs shows up when trying to format nested lists of possibly different types like enumerations or definition lists under the requirement of typographical excellence. More complex examples are presented in Xmlbible book of [Harold2004].